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Chervil Root


Chervil Root
Chervil Root has not always been widely known in the UK but it's slightly sweet, delicate and nutty flavour has always been popular in France.

Despite being a little known root vegetable for all these years, British chefs have taken to the Chervil Root, which possesses a flavour crossed between a carrot and celeriac.

Inside it is creamy white and accompanies meat and fish perfectly.

Chervil Root

Parsley Root

Resembling the Parsnip but tasting quite different, Parsley Root tastes of a combination of celeriac and carrot, with hints of parsley and turnip.

But like Parsnip, it can be roasted, pureed or deep-fried but is equally at home in stews and soups.

Parsley Root

Spaghetti Squash

This highly sought after member of the curcurbita family, and a new world squash, originally native to Central America, is renowned for it's unique texture, and long transcucent strings, hence it's name.

Large, oval and yellow, with distincrive green stripes, this variety looks similar to a melon and has a moist, mellow, nutty flavor. It has yellowish flesh and once cooked, seperates into the strands that resemble pasta.

Spaghetti Squash

Loose Chestnuts

Loose Chestnuts are now in stock.

Thanks to the Romans, who valued this sleek, shiny nut as a cooking ingredient and brought them to Britain, we have a deep appreciation of the Chestnut in this country,

Versatile in sweet or savoury dishes and harvested between October and March, we are almost at the heart of the season - sales will hot up in December during the lead up to Christmas.

Among all the nuts, Chestnuts contain the least amount of fat and the highest amount of starch. As a matter of fact, Chestnuts have twice as much starch as potatoes; so they are very high in complex carbohydrates.

Loose Chestnuts

Ornamental Gourds

Not to be mistaken as an edible Autumn product you can't say that these colourful, beautifully shapen Gourds are not the epitomy of the season.

Ornamental Gourds

Munchkins

Cute as a button these miniature or baby pumpkins not only look great but taste fantastic too!

Munchkins

French Quince

We are delighted now the French season has started, as their crops of Quince have much more flavour than their Turkish counterparts.

The Quince might belong to the same family as the common or garden apple and pear but aside from it’s appearance that’s where the similarity ends. Unlike its distant cousins, the Quince’s flesh is quite bitter until cooked.

French Quince

Pink Lautrec Garlic

Dried Garlic is at its very best at this time of year and our Lautrec Pink Garlic, is the most superior product that you will find.
Indeed it is so celebrated that Rungis Market holds an annual competition in early autumn, to see who can stack the manouilles (bunches) the highest!
All layers of skin, except the final one, are removed to reveal the pink gems hiding underneath, which gives Lautrec Garlic its distinctive look.

Rumour has it that an innkeeper in the South-Western French village of Lautrec, planted the first cloves, paid to him in kind from a travelling merchant. The crop grew and farming expanded, eventually giving rise to the booming business there is today.

Pink Lautrec Garlic

French Nettles

Unmistakeably "green" in flavour, somewhere between spinach, cabbage and broccoli, just use these delicious French Nettles anywhere you would use other fresh greens.

Great in soups but just as good paired with eggs, in risottos, with pasta and, we are reliably informed in bubble and squeak!

French Nettles